How I Make $18+ Per Hour As A Freelance Proofreader

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Are you interested in what a freelance proofreader does? My friend Caitlin is a successful freelance proofreader who turned her side hustle into a full-time business.

Her first year of being a freelance proofreader, she made over $43,000 working 30 hours a week. 

This is a great opportunity for someone who wants to ditch their 9-5 and start working from home. It’s not easy work and it’s not for everyone, but a lot of people enjoy the work (and they get to work from home!).

If you’re interested in becoming a freelance proofreader, keep on reading.

What is a proofreader?

A proofreader serves as the last set of eyes on a piece of content before it’s published.

Proofreaders make sure there are no spelling, punctuation, grammatical, or formatting errors, and they ensure the content is as polished as possible.

How much do proofreaders make? 

This is one of the most common questions I get! Unfortunately, there is no “set” amount of money a proofreader can make. It all depends on how many hours you’re willing to work, your skill set, and your marketing efforts.

But to give you some idea, I made $40,000+ a year as a proofreader working an average of 30 hours per week.

Check out Caitlin’s FREE 76-minute workshop to kick off your proofreading career and teach you essential facts and tips about proofreading as a full-time career.

How can someone get started proofreading?

First off, you need to make sure you have a knack for finding errors.

Proofreading can be taught, but only to a certain point — you need to have a natural eye for it. If you do have that “Eagle Eye,” then you should hone those skills with a qualified training program.

Can you tell us how much money some of your students are making?

The amount of money you make is dependent on how much you want to work and your skill set.

I have graduates who proofread as a side hustle to make a few extra hundred bucks a month, and they love it.

It’s perfect for them.

Then I have some graduates who’ve quit their day jobs and replaced their former income with freelance proofreading — some have even exceeded what they were making at those jobs!

What are the initial expenses when starting?

Starting up a freelance proofreading business is FAR less expensive than other businesses — not to mention a tiny fraction of the cost of a college degree.

If you decide to start a business with the help of one of my courses, you can expect to pay between $400 – $1,200 for training. That would include lifetime access to a course and peer community.

It assumes you already have a computer + Wi-Fi.

There are additional textbooks and equipment you can buy that are recommended, but they are not required.

Many students complete the training using what they’ve got and added in more streamlined equipment later on.

Usually, students recouped all of their start-up costs within 1-2 months of graduating — their investment in the training quickly paid for itself.

Do people need to get trained to become a proofreader?

Yes! I tell all my students that you have to have that “Eagle Eye” I mentioned before to point out errors in content, but honing those skills with proper training is crucial.

I have trained hundreds of proofreaders through my general proofreading and transcript proofreading online courses.

Check out Caitlin’s FREE 76-minute workshop to kick off your proofreading career and teach you important facts and tips about proofreading as a full-time career.

What’s one tip you have for someone who wants to become a successful proofreader?

Make sure that proofreading is something you want to do.

You have to have a passion for finding errors and polishing content. If you don’t, you won’t succeed — it’s that simple.

If you’re on the fence and not sure if proofreading is right for you, check out my FREE workshop.

I go over exactly how to become a general proofreader, how to hone your skills, and even give you a sneak peek into how to get clients!

It’s the perfect, no-risk way to find out if proofreading is right for you before you invest in training to “go big” with it.

There is no obligation to sign up for the course. Check out her free 76-minute workout to determine if it’s a good opportunity for you. 

Check out Caitlin’s FREE 76-minute workshop to kick off your proofreading career and teach you essential facts and tips about proofreading as a full-time career.

Are you interested in becoming a freelance proofreader?

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This Post Has 3 Comments

  1. I find all these information really useful and interesting, but my only concern is if it’s possible to become proofreader, or transcriptionist, or freelance writer when English is not your first language? Although my mother tongue is Russian, I’m pretty confident in my English, as I live and work in Malta for the past 15 years, speaking, writing and reading English mostly. My Russian is excellent (which is not necessarily for all native speakers of any language as far as I know), and I believe it might be useful for some translation work as well. Could you please give me your opinion on this matter and where should I start from? Thank you very much! Julia Sammut

    1. Russian interpreters and translators are needed online. I’ve seen jobs listed on FlexJobs for Russian interpreters, but you could do a quick Google search and type in “Russian interpreters jobs” or “Russian transactor jobs” and you should find job opportunities that way. Or vice versa with English translator jobs for Russian speakers. Hope this makes sense.

      1. Thank you very much for the reply! I’ll do it!????

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